Caring for those who have cared for us.

Heritage CemetEries Project Inc.

(306)742-4414 or (306)743-5060

            (306)743-5202

To contact us:

Affiliated

Churches and Cemeteries of Langenburg

The St. Paul’s Lutheran Church—Missouri synod originated in 1914. On Jan 6, 1918 a congregation was formed and the “little free church” was purchased. In January 1969 the church was closed.

In 1989, St. Paul’s, the oldest Lutheran congregation in Saskatchewan, celebrated 100 years. The church, built in 1903, was added to a number of times, and in 2000 underwent a sizable expansion and total renovation

In 1938 the congregation voted to join the Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada. In 1957 the congregation decided to relocate in Langenburg.  Langenburg was a more central location for those coming from Churchbridge.

The first church was built in 1911 where the present church stands.  Because the congregation needed a larger church, they began building in 1949.  The dedication was on June 21, 1951.

The first annual meeting of the congregation took place on Jan15, 1912, the cemetery is still in use today.

Perhaps the most important event in the history of the community was the opening of the new Ingleside United Church on June 20, 1954.  This beautiful little church with its memorial pews and plaque was built by community

Perhaps the most important event in the history of the community was the opening of the new Ingleside United Church on June 20, 1954.  This beautiful little church with its memorial pews and plaque was built by community efforts

In 1907 a rectory was built and Father Reinde became the first resident priest.  In 1911 Father Vorst came and was in Landshut until 1955 except for four years 1921-1925 when Father Hart served them.  In 1955 Father

St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church owes its development to priests from Kaposvar and Esterhazy.  In 1888-1889 settlers came to an area of 500 square miles, which included Langenburg and Landshut.

In 1972 the congregation became very small, and regular services were not possible.  In 1988 the church building was given over to the Wolverine Hobby and Historical Society and became part of the Spy Hill Museum.

Non–Affiliated Cemeteries of Langenburg RM

This cemetery became very famous during the 1930’s as a mysterious light was seen in the vicinity.  The story even hit the TV national news in 1974.  It is believed that swamp gases may have caused the light. 

This cemetery was started in 1918 on NW corner of SW 29-21-32.  Four graves with tombstones were in a two-acre page wire fence. The reason this cemetery was started was to prevent the Spanish flu from spreading.

This cemetery is located on SE 12-20-31 near the road.  Wayne, a twelve-year-old boy was buried there in 1907.  He fell off his horse and was killed.  A tombstone stands by his grave.

Helen Berger, a nine-year-old girl, one of the first pupils in the first school in Langenburg built in 1890, died and was buried on the homestead.  This is now cultivated land and there is no sign of the grave.  One acre on the site is open

This cemetery is located on the north side of SW 22-21-31.  A child of John and Augusta Hertlein died in 1888 and was buried on the Hertlein homestead.  The grave is unmarked.